City Museum awakens your inner child

The City Museum is made mostly of reused objects found locally.

Photo Courtesy of Flickr

The City Museum is made mostly of reused objects found locally.

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The year is 1983. Bob Cassilly buys an abandoned shoe factory with a vision of something great, something people could only imagine—until 14 years later. Flash forward to 1997—the City Museum opens. The City Museum now has around 700,000 visitors a year.

The City Museum is home to recycled, well, (almost) everything. The art, the bus on the roof, airplanes, you name it, it’s probably recycled. The building is as well—it was a shoe factory, but now is the “ultimate urban playground.” They used salvaged bridges, old chimneys, construction cranes and tile—all locally sourced, too.

I have been to the City Museum a few times, and there’s absolutely no words for it. It is so incredible how one man, Cassilly, could come up with an idea so spectacular, let alone actually make it happen. You pull up and you see a whole playground on the outside: a ball pit, castle looking buildings you can climb up, an airplane with wire tunnels connecting it to another airplane and a slide. On the roof, a bus hanging off the side, a ferris wheel, little food bar, water fountain and big slide.

On the first floor, there is a whale…with hidden caves inside of it! And all around the first floor there are caves that seem never ending. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to find and go in every nook and cranny in there, there’s too many to discover. The history they have on display there is remarkable as well. There are objects displayed from a hundred, maybe more, years ago. They have art everywhere; I mean, let’s be honest, the City Museum IS art.

I would definitely recommend going to the City Museum. I have barely touched the surface of the incredible things you can see or do at the City Museum. People around the world are in awe of this magnificent building—we need to use our short distance (compared to others) away from it to our advantage. Spring break trip? I think yes.