The Advocate

Biomedical science students host blood drive

Sophomore+Abbie+Vollmer+talks+to+senior+Gina+Luko+while+she+donates+blood.+%E2%80%9CThe+students+get+to+see+what%E2%80%99s+going+on%2C%E2%80%9D+science+teacher+Krista+Williams+said.+%E2%80%9CThey+have+the+opportunity+to+help+their+future+patients+or+people+in+the+real+world.%E2%80%9D+Students+were+able+to+watch+Mercy+Hospital%E2%80%99s+medical+professionals+take+blood+while+interacting+with+blood+donors.
Sophomore Abbie Vollmer talks to senior Gina Luko while she donates blood. “The students get to see what’s going on,” science teacher Krista Williams said. “They have the opportunity to help their future patients or people in the real world.” Students were able to watch Mercy Hospital’s medical professionals take blood while interacting with blood donors.

Sophomore Abbie Vollmer talks to senior Gina Luko while she donates blood. “The students get to see what’s going on,” science teacher Krista Williams said. “They have the opportunity to help their future patients or people in the real world.” Students were able to watch Mercy Hospital’s medical professionals take blood while interacting with blood donors.

Photo by Willa Reust

Photo by Willa Reust

Sophomore Abbie Vollmer talks to senior Gina Luko while she donates blood. “The students get to see what’s going on,” science teacher Krista Williams said. “They have the opportunity to help their future patients or people in the real world.” Students were able to watch Mercy Hospital’s medical professionals take blood while interacting with blood donors.

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Biomedical science classes organized the WHS spring blood drive held March 19 to help those in need. Project Lead the Way students were able to gain medical experience while helping the community.

“When we talk about medical issues, we don’t usually get to see the patients, but today they get to see people helping other people,” science teacher Krista Williams said.

Students over the age of 16 were encouraged to donate with parent permission. A significant 140 student donors signed up to make a positive difference this spring.

“I chose to donate blood because it’s a really easy way to help people who are in need,” sophomore Emily Hahne said. “It doesn’t take much work.”

According to the World Health Organization, donated blood can be used to help cancer patients, complex surgical operations, pregnancy complications and more. By assisting and donating at the blood drive, WHS students have united to help in a variety of ways in order to save lives.

“There’s people who work at the snack table for after students donate blood and people who help the nurses with the donating,” sophomore Grace Reinken said. “Everyone comes together and helps for a good cause.”

About the Writer
Willa Reust, Editorials Editor
This is Willa’s second year on staff, but first as opinion’s editor. Outside of newspaper she is involved in orchestra and NHS. She enjoys listening to music, spending time with her friends, watching her favorite shows and practicing her viola.
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Biomedical science students host blood drive